Posts Tagged ‘empathy’

Teaching Our Children to Trust – Building Sustainable Relationships with Authority Figures

Growing up we always heard adults say, “it’s all about respect,” when addressing relationships between children, teens, and young adults with teachers, pastors, police, and parents. But that is not altogether accurate. It is not “all about respect” and it is most certainly not just about respect. Relationships on both a personal and public level are built not only on respect, but on trust, understanding and the consistency of fulfilled expectations. As a firm believer that respect is something which must be earned, when it comes to these other characteristics they are the building blocks of a respectful relationship, thus inherently must come first.

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Raising a family with a Spouse suffering from a Chronic Disease

As I sat breastfeeding my infant while entertaining my toddler, half-listening to a doctor (a gastroenterologist to be exact) tell myself and my husband that he was being diagnosed with Crohn’s Disease, I was overwhelmed to say the least. This made no sense. How was my 29 year old, strong, healthy, weight lifting, food-loving husband being diagnosed with a disease neither of us had ever heard of? A disease that in the middle of a cold night in January 2012 crippled my husband, sent him to the hospital, and resulted in him being admitted for over a week. A disease that would change the course of our lives forever.

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Building Character In A Selfie World

We all want to raise our children to be good people with strong character, and in a recent national parent survey, an overwhelming majority believe that in today’s social media-focused world, nurturing positive character traits in children is more important than it used to be. Compassion, Honesty, Generosity – How Soon Should Parents Start Helping Their Kids Develop These Traits? Believe it or not, nearly half of parents surveyed think that preschool age is too young to begin learning social-emotional skills, skills like how to be generous, getting along with others, and compassion. So, how soon should you start… the answer may surprise you.

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Gifts for Preschoolers Holiday 2016 #DmHoliday16

There are so many toys on the market for preschoolers today, and we’re bombarded with even more via commercials, flyers, and ads around the holidays. Here at Daily Mom, we know it can be overwhelming and sometimes frustrating to choose toys that are current without being quick money-wasting fads, so we took the guesswork and stress out of shopping for your preschooler this holiday season. We’ve hand-selected our favorite toys, games, and clothing from brands we love and trust, and compiled a gift guide of things you won’t feel guilty about giving your little ones!

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Let Them Fight: Teaching Siblings to Work It Out

Parents have a rough job. Not only do they have to keep their kids healthy, fed, clothed, and sheltered they also have to teach them to be good people. If you have more than one child you know that often times some of your greatest tests of patience and use of parenting skills are used when your children are squabbling with one another.

A parent’s first instinct when they hear their children arguing in another room is to run in and help resolve the issue. However, research shows that allowing your children time and space to work out their own compromise is beneficial in many different ways as long as they have been taught the skills. Parents need to play both an active and passive role when it comes to disagreements between siblings – help them work through issues and show conflict resolution, but then step back and let them do it themselves once they have the knowledge base. 

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Talking to Your Kids about Tragedy

Parents strive to shield their children from painful situations. We want their childhoods filled with laughter, joy, and a sense of being carefree because we all know that one day the inevitable will happen – our children will see, experience, and feel the pain from tragedies. Many times these horrible situations will be far removed from our children. It will be something they hear about at school, see on television, or read about online. There are times, however, where our children experience the unfathomable. They may still be little or they may be adults, but as parents one thing never changes: we don’t want them to ever feel that pain.

Nonetheless the world is a scary and unforgiving place. It is our job as parents to do our best to teach our children how to cope with such horrific events such as the massacre in Orlando, and how to reach beyond the initial scope of pain and hate to one of empathy and love for those most affected. 

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How to Pack an Amazing Samaritan’s Purse Shoebox

‘Tis the season when we’re all searching for ways to involve our children in giving back to the community. Christmas is, after all, the perfect time to start meaningful family traditions that reflect the desire to embody gratitude for our blessings while at the same time showing empathy for others. 

There are Angel Trees, where you can choose an “ornament” from the tree that names a specific item that a child in your local area might need or want for Christmas that otherwise they wouldn’t receive. There are food pantries and soup kitchens who need volunteers to stock shelves and assist with serving or delivering food to hungry families. There are families that churches or schools may “adopt” for the holiday season and assist with making sure they can feed their families as well as enjoy gifts. And there are homeless shelters who desperately need blankets and coats to give to folks who cannot afford to stay warm during the winter months.

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