How To: Deep Clean Your Dyson Vacuum

The chances are high that you use a vacuum to clean your carpets in your home on a regular basis. But have you ever stopped and thought about giving the vacuum itself a deep cleaning job? If you have a Dyson vacuum, we will show you all the tips and tricks to getting a deep clean – which, in turn, ensures a better cleaning job on your carpets!

Materials Needed:

  • Air Compressor, or a can of compressed air 
  • Water
  • Scissors or knife
  • Flathead Screwdriver 
  • Dish soap and paper towel

*Steps 1-5 should be done outside*

Step One:

Empty the canister of any debris. Remove the outer canister shell by pressing the button on the back between the two red pieces.

Step Two:

Open the bottom flap and remove the foam filter. Put aside for later.

Step Three:

Flip the vacuum upside down, and using a flathead screwdriver, remove the bottom roller cover. Use scissors to remove any hair that may be trapped on the roller. When clean, use the compressed air to blow out any dust or dirt trapped in visible spaces. Put roller cover back on.

Step Four:

Put cyclone part of the vacuum over a deep trashcan, and use the compressed air on every single tiny hole (this part is super messy! Beware!) Make sure that you turn the cyclone part over, and blow the air on the inside as well.

Step Five:

Clean the canister section using the compressed air.

*Gather the cyclone, canister, and sponge filter and move inside to water source.*

Step Six:

Run the sponge filter under water and squeeze until the water coming out is clear.

Step Seven:

Run water through the canister.

Step Eight:

Wash the canister thoroughly with dish soap.

Step Nine:

Use a damp paper towel to wipe off the cyclone section, and make sure that all the tiny holes are clean, and not plugged.

Step Ten:

Make sure that all sections that came into contact with water are laid out to completely dry. (At least 24 hours.) Leaving any form of moisture in the canister or cyclone part will cause dirt to clump in the holes, and make routine canister emptying much more difficult. Additionally, Dyson does not recommend running the cyclone section directly under running water!

Coral large separator

We suggest deep cleaning your vacuum once every 3-4 months. It will both elongate the life of your Dyson vacuum, as well as make sure that your carpeting is getting properly cleaned. Having any part of the cyclone clogged will not allow proper air circulation, and will, in turn, not allow the maximum amount of suction for your flooring.

Are you interested in more cleaning tips, check out this post on Spring Cleaning: Frequently Forgotten Items

Photo Credits: The Memoirs of Megan

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Megan

Megan lives in Colorado with her husband, 2 year old daughter, and infant son. Outside of chasing around her energetic toddler while nursing her son simultaneously, she loves swimming, celebrity gossip, college football, learning photography, and writing for her personal blog, The Memoirs of Megan. You can get to know her more through Facebook,Twitter, and Pinterest

Comments (16)

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    Sucker For Vacuums

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    This is a great, great article and should really help people extend the life of their Dyson vacuum.

    The photos are really helpful and the step by step instructions make the job much easier – Thank you Daily Mom!!

    Reply

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    gail

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    Great article, but I can’t find a button to remove the canister. This is the part of my vac that gets the dirtiest.
    Thanks for your help.

    Reply

    • Avatar

      Megan B.

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      Hi Gail!
      There is a red button on back of your cannister that will take the shell off. Is that what you are referring to?

      Reply

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    Paulla

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    I really appreciate this info very helpful. I do have one question on how to clean the extension hose? Someone decided to clean up used kitty litter with it and I can’t figure out how to clean it out. Thanks for your help.

    Reply

    • Avatar

      Megan B.

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      Paulla,
      Are you saying it’s clumped inside? I think I would try to stick something through it, then use the air compressor to blow it out more. The extension hose will come off the expandable part. :)

      Reply

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    LuAnn R.

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    Thanks for the tips! I never really thought about taking it all apart like that, so I will definitely give it a try! The one thing that drives me crazy, is all the hair that wraps around the bar/brushes! We have 3 girls in our house, and all of our hair is pretty long. I have to spend at least 20 minutes every couple of weeks, cutting/ripping all the hair off the beater bar! Any tips or suggestions to make this quicker, or better yet, not happen at all?? Thanks!

    Reply

    • Avatar

      Megan B.

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      LuAnn,
      Sorry, no tips for prevention. It’ll happen with any rotating vacuum brush. I use scissors or a sharp pocket knife to cut mine faster.

      Reply

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    ChristinaE12

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    One suggestion on the brush bar/roller.. That thing can be removed. Or at least it can on mine. Saves a lot of time cleaning it.

    Basically just flip the vacuum over and you will see plastic fasteners on the bottom plate. About quarter sized with a slit in the middle. There may be up to a few depending on model. Use a wide flat head screwdriver, coin (nickels work good), whatever works for you.. to turn those (make sure all the way) which allows the brush bar to slide out. I do believe some models have a belt on the bar. You just slide it off. This allows you to easily clean it over a garbage can. I personally use a seam ripper or letter opener and run it down the bar a couple times until all the stuff is cut. Then just pull all the hair off.

    All in all, I can uninstall, completely clean, and reinstall it in about a minute.

    Some models may be slightly different. But should be fairly simple and along the same lines.

    Reply

    • Avatar

      Megan B.

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      Hi Christina!
      I touched on taking the roller out under step #3, but I love the suggestion of using a seam ripper! Great tip! Thanks for commenting. :)

      Reply

  • Avatar

    Lorien

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    I feel like I should write you a check for $300. I was about to start hunting for a new Dyson (mine is 5 years old). I followed your instructions yesterday and today, it works like new! THANK YOU!!

    Reply

    • Avatar

      Megan B.

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      Lorien,
      I also take credit cards. ;-) Just kidding! I’m so glad it worked out for you!! I try to do this every few months, myself, just so it doesn’t ever get that bad ever. Thanks for commenting.

      Reply

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    Alayna

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    I have a Dyson with the ball, and there is also a filter in the ball part that can be pulled out and cleaned! Just recline the vacuum part all the way, make sure the opening for the ball part is at the top, and press the button to open it up!

    Reply

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    Brittany

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    Great step by step!!! My Dyson is sparkly clean! Thank you!!!!!!!

    Reply

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    Linda

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    I have had the Dyson Animal for several years, when I got mine the sales person told me to take it outside every so often and take it apart and blow it out with the air compressor, my husband does this for me no less then once a month. I got an extra filer off of Amazon so if needed I can wash one and let it air dry and pop my extra in. My Dyson runs like new… so easy and takes no time at all to do.

    Reply

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    nikki

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    I have a question about the inside part on step 4. If you turn it over mine gets so dirty inside how do you clean this short of using a baby bottle brush? It has gotten so bad about an 1/8 in build up. I love the Dyson but man this is the only issue that makes mine lag and not such up.

    Reply

    • Avatar

      Megan

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      Nikki,
      I personally use an air compressor that is fairly high powered and so I blow the air up the inside. I know of other sites that suggest running the entire part under warm water, however, when I contacted Dyson to confirm that, they specifically told me not to get it wet, and that it voids any warranty. If the air pressure doesn’t dislodge the build up, I would personally take it to get it professionally serviced, and then use this tutorial to maintain it every 3-4 months as suggested in the post.
      Good luck!

      Reply

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